2/19/21 Update

  • As you may already know, Public Health is preparing for vaccines to be distributed to those working in education who are 50 years of age and older starting next week.  While we are planning to schedule a TUSD Vaccination POD (Point of Delivery) for only TUSD employees, we do not yet have a confirmed date from Public Health.  However, educators will still be able to receive the vaccine at one of several locations.  These locations are found in the links below:

    Stanislaus County Public Health Vaccination Clinics: http://www.schsa.org/coronavirus/vaccine/
    Additional vaccine providers can be found here: http://schsa.org/coronavirus/vaccine/pdf/approved-providers.pdf
    Stan Emergency Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/StanEmergency

    Some of these locations allow you to make an appointment and we encourage you to do that if available.  We recognize there is a limited time outside the regular work day to attend one of the vaccination clinics.  Unfortunately, at this time, you will need to do your best to receive your vaccine outside of regular work hours as securing substitutes continues to be a challenge.  You will need to request and secure a substitute and take personal leave time if you are able to get an appointment during regular hours of work.

    **Important, we recently received word that vaccines for educators at the County Public Health Clinics are limited to afternoons only, after the end of the school day.  However, there will be a designated line that prioritizes educators at these clinics.

    Please remember to take your staff ID and another form of ID that verifies your age.  It’s a good idea to also take a recent paystub. 

    We will continue to update you as we receive new information related to vaccine distribution. 

Stanislaus County Approved Providers and Vaccine Information

Vaccinate Stanislaus

StanEmergency

Who Will You Vaccinate For?

  • Eric Julien
    “My grandfather and his brother were doctors who had to try to save the lives of people infected with the 1918 H1 N1 flu. They had no vaccine nor did they have any of the modern drugs to help fight the symptoms. At the worst point in that pandemic, they spent seven, twenty-four hour days treating victims. My father, in his career, treated many potentially deadly viruses, with some help from vaccines that mostly worked but did have some adverse effects. My degree was in biology and as an undergraduate, I was placed in a medical school immunology class as only two of us signed up for the lower division class. Toughest class ever but I learned how disease works and how we stop it. These new vaccines are designed to not have the secondary hazards of past vaccines and the science behind them is genius. I will vaccinate because it will prevent me from infecting others who will infect others. I trust the science and this will stop the spread and let us get back to normal.”